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You’re not alone: Learn more about help for insomnia


In any given year, as many as 4 of every 10 adults have symptoms of insomnia, according to the National Sleep Foundation.1 Insomnia can affect you in many different ways. Some of the most common sleep complaints are:2,3

  • Difficulty staying asleep
  • Early-morning awakenings (waking up too early in the morning without being able to return to sleep)
Sleep is an important part of a healthy life

If you suffer from one or more of these common sleep complaints, you may not be getting the sleep you need.

Without enough sleep, you may not think as clearly or function at your best. The optimal sleep goal is 7 to 8 hours per night for most people.4 Without enough sleep, you may not think as clearly or function at your best.4 Insomnia is also associated with serious medical conditions such as anxiety,5 depression,5,6 obesity7 and diabetes.7,8

If you think you have insomnia, you're not alone. The first step is to talk to your healthcare provider about your sleep problems. Depending on your diagnosis, your healthcare provider may prescribe Silenor, which may put you on a path to more sleep. Silenor is indicated to treat patients diagnosed with sleep maintenance insomnia. Silenor is not approved to treat any other condition.

No risk of dependency or addiction

In a patient survey, two-thirds (66 percent) of respondents said "risk of dependence or addiction" was their greatest concern about taking a sleep medication.9 If you have this same concern, you should know there are treatment options.

Silenor is the first and only non-controlled prescription sleep medication for people having trouble staying asleep. Silenor has no abuse potential, and is not associated with physical dependence or addiction.10

Get on the path to more sleep today

The first step is to talk to your healthcare provider about your sleep problems. If you have difficulty staying asleep, Silenor may help. Ask for Silenor by name. There is no generic Silenor.

Silenor is a prescription sleep medicine that is used to treat people with insomnia who have trouble staying asleep.

Important Safety Information
Call your doctor if your insomnia worsens or is not better within 7 to 10 days. This may mean that there is another condition causing your sleep problem.

Be sure that you are able to devote 7 to 8 hours to sleep before being active again. Silenor should be taken within 30 minutes of bedtime. Do not take with alcohol or with other medicines that can make you sleepy. If you are on a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) or have taken a MAOI within the past two weeks, you should not take Silenor. You should not take Silenor if you have an eye problem called narrow angle glaucoma that is not being treated, if you have severe urinary retention, or if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in Silenor. You should not drive or operate machinery at night after taking Silenor. Until you know how you will react to Silenor, you should be careful in performing such activities during the day following taking Silenor. Before you take Silenor, tell your doctor if you have a history of depression, mental illness or suicidal thoughts. You should call your doctor right away if after taking Silenor you walk, drive, eat or engage in other activities while asleep. Drowsiness is the most common adverse event observed in clinical trials. For more information, please see the complete Prescribing Information, including the Medication Guide.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

References:
1.  Can't sleep? What to know about insomnia. National Sleep Foundation Web site. http://www.sleepfoundation.org/article/sleep-relatedproblems/insomnia-and-sleep. Accessed March 9, 2010.
2.  2008 Sleep in America™ Poll. Summary of findings. National Sleep Foundation.
3.  2009 Sleep in America™ Poll. Summary of findings. National Sleep Foundation.
4.  Banks S, Dinges DF. Behavioral and physiological consequences of sleep restriction. J Clin Sleep Med. 2007;3(5):519-528.
5.  Taylor DJ, Lichstein KL, Durrence HH, et al. Epidemiology of insomnia, depression, and anxiety. Sleep. 2005;29(11):1457-1464.
6.  Perlis ML, Giles DE, Buysse DJ, et al. Self-reported sleep disturbance as a prodromal symptom in recurrent depression. J Affect Disord. 1997;42(2-3):209-212.
7.  Spiegel K, Knutson K, Leproult R, et al. Sleep loss: a novel risk factor for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. J Appl Physiol. 2005;99(5):2008-2019.
8.  Cappuccio FP, D'Elia L, Strazzullo P, et al. Quantity and quality of sleep and incidence of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2010;33(2):414-420.
9.  Data on File. Panel Intelligence. Quantitative Surveys. Insomnia Treatment: The Consumer Perspective. April 2008.
10.  Silenor prescribing information. Somaxon Pharmaceuticals, Inc., March 2010.

Sponsored content provided by Somaxon.
©2011 Somaxon Pharmaceuticals, Inc. All rights reserved. Silenor and Somaxon are registered trademarks of Somaxon Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
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Indication and Important Safety Information

Silenor is a prescription sleep medicine that is used to treat people with insomnia who have trouble staying asleep.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Call your doctor if your insomnia worsens or is not better within 7 to 10 days. This may mean that there is another condition causing your sleep problem.

Be sure that you are able to devote 7 to 8 hours to sleep before being active again. Silenor should be taken within 30 minutes of bedtime. Do not take with alcohol or with other medicines that can make you sleepy. If you are on a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) or have taken a MAOI within the past two weeks, you should not take Silenor. You should not take Silenor if you have an eye problem called narrow angle glaucoma that is not being treated, if you have severe urinary retention, or if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in Silenor. You should not drive or operate machinery at night after taking Silenor. Until you know how you will react to Silenor, you should be careful in performing such activities during the day following taking Silenor. Before you take Silenor, tell your doctor if you have a history of depression, mental illness or suicidal thoughts. You should call your doctor right away if after taking Silenor you walk, drive, eat or engage in other activities while asleep. Drowsiness is the most common adverse event observed in clinical trials. For more information, please see the complete Prescribing Information, including the Medication Guide.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.